IIS Crypto the best tool to configure SSL/TLS cipher suites

IIS Crypto is a free tool that gives administrators the ability to enable or disable protocols, ciphers, hashes and key exchange algorithms on Windows Server 2008, 2012 and 2016. It also lets you reorder SSL/TLS cipher suites offered by IIS, implement best practices with a single click, create custom templates and test your website.

Features

– Single click to secure your website using best practices
– Create custom templates that can be saved and run on multiple servers
– Stop DROWN, logjam, FREAK, POODLE and BEAST attacks
– Disable weak protocols and ciphers such as SSL 2.0, 3.0 and MD5
– Enable TLS 1.1 and 1.2
– Enable forward secrecy
– Reorder cipher suites
– Built in Best Practices, PCI, PCI 3.1 and FIPS 140-2 templates
– Site scanner to test your configuration
– Command line version

Screenshot1

WMI Filters for OS version

DESKTOPS

ANY WINDOWS DESKTOP OS

  • Any Windows Desktop OS – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE ProductType = “1” AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Desktop OS – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE ProductType = “1” AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 7

  • Windows 7
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.1%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 7 – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.1%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 7 – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.1%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 8.1

  • Windows 8.1
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 8.1 – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 8.1 – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 8.1

  • Windows 8.1
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 8.1 – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 8.1 – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 10

  • Windows 10
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE ‘Version like ‘10.0.%’ AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 10 – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “10.0.% AND ProductType=”1” AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 10 – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “10.0.%””6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

SERVERS

ANY WINDOWS SERVER OS

  • Any Windows Server OS
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”) OR (ProductType = “3”)
  • Any Windows Server OS – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”) OR (ProductType = “3”) AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server OS – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”) OR (ProductType = “3”) AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Domain Controller
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”)
  • Any Windows Server – Domain Controller – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”) AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Domain Controller – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”) AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Non-Domain Controller
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “3”)
  • Any Windows Server – Non- Domain Controller – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “3”) AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Non-Domain Controller – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “3”) AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS SERVER 2008 R2

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 – 64-bit – DC
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.1%” AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 – 64-bit – non-DC
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.1%” AND ProductType=”3″

WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2

  • Windows Server 2012 R2 – 64-bit – DC
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 – 64-bit – non-DC
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”3″

WINDOWS SERVER 2016

Windows Server 2016 certification

Microsoft is pleased to announce the release of the new MCSA: Windows Server 2016 certification.

The new MCSA can be earned by taking and passing the following three exams:

  • 70-740 – Installation, Storage, and Compute with Windows Server 2016
  • 70-741 – Networking with Windows Server 2016
  • 70-742 – Identity with Windows Server 2016

Exam 740 is scheduled for beta release in early October 2016, with the other exams following soon after.

Individuals who currently hold either an MCSA: Windows Server 2012 or MCSA: Windows Server 2008 certification will be able to upgrade to the new 2016 certification through a single, upgrade exam:

  • 70-743 – Upgrade Your Skills to MCSA: Windows Server 2016

Exam 743 is scheduled for beta release in late July 2016. 

MOC courses corresponding to all four Windows Server 2016 exams are scheduled for release in September 2016, while practice tests will be available shortly after each exam beta period ends.

New options for specialization and continuing education through the MCSE program will be announced later this summer.

Cumulative Update 2 for Exchange Server 2016

.Net 4.6.1 Support

Support for .Net 4.6.1 is now available for Exchange Server 2016 and 2013 with these updates. We fully support customers upgrading servers running 4.5.2 to 4.6.1 without removing Exchange. We recommend that customers apply Exchange Server 2016 Cumulative Update 2 or Exchange Server 2013 Cumulative Update 13 before upgrading .Net FrameWork. Servers should be placed in maintenance mode during the upgrade as you would do when applying a Cumulative Update. Support for .Net 4.6.1 requires the following post release fixes for .Net as well.

Note: .Net 4.6.1 installation replaces the existing 4.5.2 installation. If you attempt to roll back the .Net 4.6.1 update, you will need to install .Net 4.5.2 again.

AutoReseed Support for BitLocker

Beginning with Exchange 2013 CU13 and Exchange 2016 CU2, the Disk Reclaimer function within AutoReseed supports BitLocker. By default, this feature is disabled. For more information on how to enable this functionality, please seeEnabling BitLocker on Exchange Servers.

SHA-2 Support for Self-Signed Certificates

The New-ExchangeCertificate cmdlet has been updated to produce a SHA-2 certificate for all self-signed certificates created by Exchange. Creating a SHA-2 certificate is the default behaviour for the cmdlet. Existing certificates will not automatically be regenerated but newly installed servers will receive SHA-2 certificates by default. Customers may opt to replace existing non-SHA2 certificates generated by previous releases as they see fit.

Migration to Modern Public Folder Resolved

The issue reported in KB3161916 has been resolved.

 

This cumulative update fixes the following issues:

This cumulative update also fixes the issues that are described in the KB 3160339 MS16-079: Security update for Microsoft Exchange: June 14, 2016 and KB 3134844 Cumulative Update 1 for Exchange Server 2016

Microsoft Knowledge Base articles.
This update also includes new daylight saving time (DST) updates for Exchange Server 2016. For more information about DST, go to Daylight Saving Time Help and Support Center.

Download: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=52968

Setup MDT 2013 (Update 2) to encrypt Windows 10 devices (Laptops) automaticlly

This  will show you how to configure your environment for BitLocker, the disk volume encryption built into Windows 10 Enterprise and Windows 10 Pro, using MDT. BitLocker in Windows 10 has two requirements in regard to an operating system deployment:

  • A protector, which can either be stored in the Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip, or stored as a password.
  • To configure your environment for BitLocker, you will need to do the following:
  1. Configure Active Directory for BitLocker.
  2. Download the various BitLocker scripts and tools.
  3. Configure the rules (CustomSettings.ini) for BitLocker.

Configure Active Directory for BitLocker

To enable BitLocker to store the recovery key and TPM information in Active Directory, you need to create a Group Policy for it in Active Directory. For this section, we are running Windows Server 2012 R2, so you do not need to extend the Schema. You do, however, need to set the appropriate permissions in Active Directory.

Note
Depending on the Active Directory Schema version, you might need to update the Schema before you can store BitLocker information in Active Directory.

In Windows Server 2012 R2 (as well as in Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2012), you have access to the BitLocker Drive Encryption Administration Utilities features, which will help you manage BitLocker. When you install the features, the BitLocker Active Directory Recovery Password Viewer is included, and it extends Active Directory Users and Computers with BitLocker Recovery information.

figure 2

Figure 2. The BitLocker Recovery information on a computer object in the contoso.com domain.

Add the BitLocker Drive Encryption Administration Utilities

The BitLocker Drive Encryption Administration Utilities are added as features via Server Manager (or Windows PowerShell):

  1. On DC01, log on as CONTOSO\Administrator, and, using Server Manager, click Add roles and features.
  2. On the Before you begin page, click Next.
  3. On the Select installation type page, select Role-based or feature-based installation, and click Next.
  4. On the Select destination server page, select DC01.contoso.com and click Next.
  5. On the Select server roles page, click Next.
  6. On the Select features page, expand Remote Server Administration Tools, expand Feature Administration Tools, select the following features, and then click Next:
    1. BitLocker Drive Encryption Administration Utilities
    2. BitLocker Drive Encryption Tools
    3. BitLocker Recovery Password Viewer
  7. On the Confirm installation selections page, click Install and then click Close.

figure 3

Figure 3. Selecting the BitLocker Drive Encryption Administration Utilities.

Create the BitLocker Group Policy

Following these steps, you enable the backup of BitLocker and TPM recovery information to Active Directory. You also enable the policy for the TPM validation profile.

  1. On DC01, using Group Policy Management, right-click the Contoso organizational unit (OU), and select Create a GPO in this domain, and Link it here.
  2. Assign the name BitLocker Policy to the new Group Policy.
  3. Expand the Contoso OU, right-click the BitLocker Policy, and select Edit. Configure the following policy settings:

    Computer Configuration / Policies / Administrative Templates / Windows Components / BitLocker Drive Encryption / Operating System Drives

    1. Enable the Choose how BitLocker-protected operating system drives can be recovered policy, and configure the following settings:
      1. Allow data recovery agent (default)
      2. Save BitLocker recovery information to Active Directory Domain Services (default)
      3. Do not enable BitLocker until recovery information is stored in AD DS for operating system drives (Do Not Enable This Winking smile)
    2. Enable the Configure TPM platform validation profile for BIOS-based firmware configurations policy.
    3. Enable the Configure TPM platform validation profile for native UEFI firmware configurations policy.

      Computer Configuration / Policies / Administrative Templates / System / Trusted Platform Module Services

    4. Enable the Turn on TPM backup to Active Directory Domain Services policy.

(Don’t forget to disable Secure Boot & Enable the secure boot again after deployment is succes vol!!)

Set permissions in Active Directory for BitLocker

In addition to the Group Policy created previously, you need to configure permissions in Active Directory to be able to store the TPM recovery information. In these steps, we assume you have downloaded the Add-TPMSelfWriteACE.vbs script from Microsoft to C:\Setup\Scripts on DC01.

  1. On DC01, start an elevated PowerShell prompt (run as Administrator).
  2. Configure the permissions by running the following command:
    cscript C:\Setup\Scripts\Add-TPMSelfWriteACE.vbs
    

figure 4

Figure 4. Running the Add-TPMSelfWriteACE.vbs script on DC01.

Add BIOS configuration tools from Dell, HP, and Lenovo

If you want to automate enabling the TPM chip as part of the deployment process, you need to download the vendor tools and add them to your task sequences, either directly or in a script wrapper.

Add tools from Dell

The Dell tools are available via the Dell Client Configuration Toolkit (CCTK). The executable file from Dell is named cctk.exe. Here is a sample command to enable TPM and set a BIOS password using the cctk.exe tool:

cctk.exe --tpm=on --valsetuppwd=Password1234
Add tools from HP

The HP tools are part of HP System Software Manager. The executable file from HP is named BiosConfigUtility.exe. This utility uses a configuration file for the BIOS settings. Here is a sample command to enable TPM and set a BIOS password using the BiosConfigUtility.exe tool:

BIOSConfigUtility.EXE /SetConfig:TPMEnable.REPSET /NewAdminPassword:Password1234

And the sample content of the TPMEnable.REPSET file:

English
Activate Embedded Security On Next Boot
*Enable
Embedded Security Activation Policy
*No prompts
F1 to Boot
Allow user to reject
Embedded Security Device Availability
*Available
Add tools from Lenovo

The Lenovo tools are a set of VBScripts available as part of the Lenovo BIOS Setup using Windows Management Instrumentation Deployment Guide. Lenovo also provides a separate download of the scripts. Here is a sample command to enable TPM using the Lenovo tools:

cscript.exe SetConfig.vbs SecurityChip Active

CustomSettings.ini

[Default]
SkipBitLocker=YES

[LAPTOP]
TaskSequenceID=LAPTOP
MachineObjectOU=OU=Bitlocker,OU=LAPTOPS,OU=Clients,DC=wardvissers,DC=local
BDEKeyLocation=\\mdt01.wardvissers.local\Bitlocker$

Source

Staying up-to-date with Windows Server updates for Remote Desktop Services (RDS)

Microsoft Remote Desktop Team get customer enquiries asking which RDS updates are available for a particular Windows Server platform; or when providing support we need to verify if certain hotfixes and servicing rollups are installed on the customers’ servers. To make it easier for customers and ourselves, we regularly revise KB articles that list all of the available updates specific to Remote Desktop services for each Windows Server release:

Don’t use DHCP Option 60/66/67 when you want to use UEFI & Legacy PXE Boot with MDT

If you want to use EUFI Boot with MDT 2013 Update X.
Don’t use DHCP Option 60/66/67!!!

DC01 = Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1
DC02 = Windows Server 2012
MDT01 = Windows Server 2012 R2

UEFI Client: Dell Laptop E5450
BIOS Client: HyperV Virtual machine with Legacy network adapert

DC1; MDT01 and DHCPServer all in Subnet1.
(IP Helper is set for DHCPServer for DHCP and for DC01 & MDT01 for DHCP and BootP – I checked serveral times if everything is right here)
UEFI Client and BIOS Client in Subnet2.

Situation1 — Using no DHCP Options and WDS running (IP HELPER-ADDRESS):
UEFI Client – Boots perfectly (contacting Server MDT01)
BIOS Client – Boots perfectly (contacting Server MDT01)

Situaion2 — Using no DHCP Options and WDS just running on MDT01:
UEFI Client – Does not boot (no error information is provided)
BIOS Client – Does not boot (no Bootfilename recieved)

Situation3 — Using DHCP Options(Option 66=”IP of MDT01″ Option 67=”\x86\wdsnbp.com”) and WDS just running on MDT01:
UEFI Client – Does not boot (no error information is provided)
BIOS Client – Boots perfectly (contacting Server DP1)

Situation4 — Using DHCP Options(Option 60=”PXEClient” Option 66=”IP of MDT01″ Option 67=”\x86\wdsnbp.com”) and WDS just running on MDT01:
UEFI Client – Boots perfectly (contacting Server DP1)
BIOS Client – Does not boot (taking hours to recieve dhcp options..)

Solution:

On most switches you can configure ip helper-addresses. This is most time al ready configured for the use of DHCP.

Add the IP of the MDT server als ip helper-address:

Example:

interface Vlan100
description GEBRUIKERS VLAN
ip address 192.168.101.254 255.255.254.0 show
ip helper-address 192.168.25.6   (DC01)
ip helper-address 192.168.25.7   (DC02)
ip helper-address 192.168.25.30 (MDT01)
end

MS15-122 Security Update for Kerberos to Address Security Feature Bypass (Bitlocker)

This security update resolves a security feature bypass in Microsoft Windows. An attacker could bypass Kerberos authentication on a target machine and decrypt drives protected by BitLocker. The bypass can be exploited only if the target system has BitLocker enabled without a PIN or USB key, the computer is domain-joined, and the attacker has physical access to the computer.

This security update is rated Important for all supported editions of Windows. For more information, see the Affected Software section.

The update addresses the bypass by adding an additional authentication check that will run prior to a password change. For more information about the vulnerability, see theVulnerability Information section.

For more information about this update, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 3105256.

Clean Up your template before Sysprep and Capture a reference image in MDT

When you create a reference Image it will in most cases it will be updated with patches. That will make the image bigger and bigger and there fore the deployment of that image will take longer and consume more network resources & unneeded disk space. That can be corrected by getting rid of superseded patches, junk, temp files and much more.

The Solution

Since MDT is the preferred method to create reference images you can download the script, import it as an application and then run the application just before the Sysprep and Capture step. The Script works for the following versions of Windows:

  • Windows 7 SP1
  • Windows 8
  • Windows 8.1 Update
  • Windows Server 2008 2 SP1
  • Windows Server 2012
  • Windows Server 2012 R2

To make this work in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 you need to add a hotfix to Packages in MDT. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2852386

Download the script

Download the script from here: Mirror Mirror 2

Action-CleanupBeforeSysprep Applicationimage

Task Sequenceimage

Created a Group Clean.
Add install a application –> Action-CleanUpBeforeSysprep
Restart Computer (Very Important) without it will not work

image

Source

Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 3.0 Released

New Features in Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 3.0
The 3.0 release of MVMC adds the ability to convert a physical computer running Windows Server 2008 or above server operating systems or Windows Vista or above client operating systems to a virtual machine running on Hyper-V host.

Standard stuff is:

  • Converts virtual disks that are attached to a VMware virtual machine to virtual hard disks (VHDs) that can be uploaded to Microsoft Azure.
  • Provides native Windows PowerShell capability that enables scripting and integration into IT automation workflows.
    Note The command-line interface (CLI) in MVMC 1.0 has been replaced by Windows PowerShell in MVMC 2.0.
  • Supports conversion and provisioning of Linux-based guest operating systems from VMware hosts to Hyper-V hosts.
  • Supports conversion of offline virtual machines.
  • Supports the new virtual hard disk format (VHDX) when converting and provisioning in Hyper-V in Windows Server® 2012 R2 and Windows Server 2012.
  • Supports conversion of virtual machines from VMware vSphere 5.5, VMware vSphere 5.1, and VMware vSphere 4.1 hosts Hyper-V virtual machines.
  • Supports Windows Server® 2012 R2, Windows Server® 2012, and Windows® 8 as guest operating systems that you can select for conversion.
  • Converts and deploys virtual machines from VMware hosts to Hyper-V hosts on any of the following operating systems:
  • Windows Server® 2012 R2
  • Windows Server® 2012
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1
  • Converts VMware virtual machines, virtual disks, and configurations for memory, virtual processor, and other virtual computing resources from the source to Hyper-V.
  • Adds virtual network interface cards (NICs) to the converted virtual machine on Hyper-V.
  • Supports conversion of virtual machines from VMware vSphere 5.5, VMware vSphere 5.0, and VMware vSphere 4.1 hosts to Hyper-V.
  • Has a wizard-driven GUI, which simplifies performing virtual machine conversions.
  • Uninstalls VMware Tools before online conversion (online only) to provide a clean way to migrate VMware-based virtual machines to Hyper-V.
    Important MVMC takes a snapshot of the virtual machine that you are converting before you uninstall VMware Tools, and then shuts down the source machine to preserve state during conversion. The virtual machine is restored to its previous state after the source disks that are attached to the virtual machine are successfully copied to the machine where the conversion process is run. At that point, the source machine in VMware can be turned on, if required.
    Important MVMC does not uninstall VMware Tools in an offline conversion. Instead, it disables VMware services, drivers, and programs only for Windows Server guest operating systems. For file conversions with Linux guest operating systems, VMware Tools are not disabled or uninstalled. We highly recommend that you manually uninstall VMware Tools when you convert an offline virtual machine.
  • Supports Windows Server and Linux guest operating system conversion. For more details, see the section “Supported Configurations for Virtual Machine Conversion” in this guide.
  • Includes Windows PowerShell capability for offline conversions of VMware-based virtual hard disks (VMDK) to a Hyper-V–based virtual hard disk file format (.vhd file).
    Note The offline disk conversion does not include driver fixes.

Download

Source