Don’t use DHCP Option 60/66/67 when you want to use UEFI & Legacy PXE Boot with MDT

If you want to use EUFI Boot with MDT 2013 Update X.
Don’t use DHCP Option 60/66/67!!!

DC01 = Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1
DC02 = Windows Server 2012
MDT01 = Windows Server 2012 R2

UEFI Client: Dell Laptop E5450
BIOS Client: HyperV Virtual machine with Legacy network adapert

DC1; MDT01 and DHCPServer all in Subnet1.
(IP Helper is set for DHCPServer for DHCP and for DC01 & MDT01 for DHCP and BootP – I checked serveral times if everything is right here)
UEFI Client and BIOS Client in Subnet2.

Situation1 — Using no DHCP Options and WDS running (IP HELPER-ADDRESS):
UEFI Client – Boots perfectly (contacting Server MDT01)
BIOS Client – Boots perfectly (contacting Server MDT01)

Situaion2 — Using no DHCP Options and WDS just running on MDT01:
UEFI Client – Does not boot (no error information is provided)
BIOS Client – Does not boot (no Bootfilename recieved)

Situation3 — Using DHCP Options(Option 66=”IP of MDT01″ Option 67=”\x86\wdsnbp.com”) and WDS just running on MDT01:
UEFI Client – Does not boot (no error information is provided)
BIOS Client – Boots perfectly (contacting Server DP1)

Situation4 — Using DHCP Options(Option 60=”PXEClient” Option 66=”IP of MDT01″ Option 67=”\x86\wdsnbp.com”) and WDS just running on MDT01:
UEFI Client – Boots perfectly (contacting Server DP1)
BIOS Client – Does not boot (taking hours to recieve dhcp options..)

Solution:

On most switches you can configure ip helper-addresses. This is most time al ready configured for the use of DHCP.

Add the IP of the MDT server als ip helper-address:

Example:

interface Vlan100
description GEBRUIKERS VLAN
ip address 192.168.101.254 255.255.254.0 show
ip helper-address 192.168.25.6   (DC01)
ip helper-address 192.168.25.7   (DC02)
ip helper-address 192.168.25.30 (MDT01)
end

Windows 10 ADK update build 10586

The latest Windows 10 ADK update, build 10586, was silently released a few days ago (Thanks deploymentresearch for the download link). In this post you learn about what’s changed.

Download link: http://download.microsoft.com/download/3/8/B/38BBCA6A-ADC9-4245-BCD8-DAA136F63C8B/adk/adksetup.exe

Warning: Do NOT upgrade your ConfigMgr 2012 R2 SP1 or MDT 2013 Update 1 environments to this build yet. For ConfigMgr, even though it seems to fix the x64 UEFI / PXE and Powershell/.NET issue, which is great, the new ADK does break Computer Refresh scenarios (Bare metal works). The error code is 0x80220014. Research and discussions with the product teams in progress… MDT 2013 Update 1 yet to be validated, but error comments on twitter does not give me a warm and fuzzy feeling.

4fbe7042-d2fd-416e-a7b3-d3458a49aeec

MDT 2013 Update 1 Now Available

The Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) 2013 Update 1 is now available on the Microsoft Download Center. This update requires the Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit (ADK) for Windows 10, available on the Microsoft Hardware Dev Center. (Scroll to the bottom of the page to the section, “Customize, assess, and deploy Windows on your hardware.” The page also includes other Windows kits; remember for deployment you only need the Windows ADK for Windows 10.)

Significant changes in MDT 2013 Update 1:

  • Support for the Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit (ADK) for Windows 10
  • Support for deployment and upgrade of Windows 10
  • Support for integration with System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager SP1 with the Windows 10 ADK (seethis post on the Configuration Manager Team blog for more information on using the Windows 10 ADK with Configuration Manager)

Here is a more detailed list of some specific changes in this release:

  • Support for new Enterprise LTSB and Education editions of Windows 10
  • Support for modern app (.appx) dependencies and bundles
  • Improved support for split image files (.swm)
  • Switched to using DISM for imaging processes (instead of deprecated ImageX)
  • Deployment Workbench revisions for deprecated content
  • Enhanced accessibility within the Deployment Workbench
  • Revised lists of time zones, regions and languages in the Deployment Wizard
  • Removed Start menu shortcut for “Remove PXE Filter”
  • Several MVP recommended fixes for Windows Updates, password handling, and PowerShell cmdlets
  • Added missing OOBE settings to Unattend.xml
  • Unattend.xml default screen resolution changed to allow for automatic scaling
  • Updated task sequence binaries from System Center 2012 R2 Configuration Manager SP1
  • New GetMajorMinorVersion function for integer comparison of Windows version numbers

How to speed up PXE boot in WDS (MDT)

 

During a PXE boot, when the boot image file is being loaded in the client, it should not take any longer than a few minutes time depending on the size of the boot.wim and your network. If it seems that your PXE boot times are extremely slow, you may be able to speed up the process by increasing the TFTP block size. This article will show you how to speed up PXE boot in WDS and SCCM.

Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) is the network protocol used for downloading all files during network boots. TFTP is an inherently slow protocol because it requires one ACK (acknowledgment) packet for each block of data that is sent. The server will not send the next block in the sequence until the ACK packet for the previous block is received. As a result, on a slow network, the round-trip time can be very long.

Change the Maximum Block Size to 16784 on your WDS server Winking smile

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Installing Windows 10 & Server vNext Technical Preview via PXE on Gen 2 VM

If you try to PXE boot a Windows 10 or Server vNext Technical Preview VM running on Hyper-V in Windows Server 2012 R2, you are greeted by a nice error message: Boot Failed. EFI Network. Failed Secure Boot Verification.

The simple fix

Until there is an update available turn off secure boot for the Gen 2 VM.

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