WMI Filters for OS version

DESKTOPS

ANY WINDOWS DESKTOP OS

  • Any Windows Desktop OS – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE ProductType = “1” AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Desktop OS – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE ProductType = “1” AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 7

  • Windows 7
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.1%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 7 – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.1%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 7 – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.1%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 8.1

  • Windows 8.1
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 8.1 – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 8.1 – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 8.1

  • Windows 8.1
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 8.1 – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 8.1 – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS 10

  • Windows 10
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE ‘Version like ‘10.0.%’ AND ProductType=”1″
  • Windows 10 – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “10.0.% AND ProductType=”1” AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Windows 10 – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “10.0.%””6.3%” AND ProductType=”1″ AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

SERVERS

ANY WINDOWS SERVER OS

  • Any Windows Server OS
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”) OR (ProductType = “3”)
  • Any Windows Server OS – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”) OR (ProductType = “3”) AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server OS – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”) OR (ProductType = “3”) AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Domain Controller
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”)
  • Any Windows Server – Domain Controller – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”) AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Domain Controller – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “2”) AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Non-Domain Controller
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “3”)
  • Any Windows Server – Non- Domain Controller – 32-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “3”) AND NOT OSArchitecture = “64-bit”
  • Any Windows Server – Non-Domain Controller – 64-bit
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem where (ProductType = “3”) AND OSArchitecture = “64-bit”

WINDOWS SERVER 2008 R2

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 – 64-bit – DC
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.1%” AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 – 64-bit – non-DC
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.1%” AND ProductType=”3″

WINDOWS SERVER 2012 R2

  • Windows Server 2012 R2 – 64-bit – DC
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”2″
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 – 64-bit – non-DC
    select * from Win32_OperatingSystem WHERE Version like “6.3%” AND ProductType=”3″

WINDOWS SERVER 2016

MS15-122 Security Update for Kerberos to Address Security Feature Bypass (Bitlocker)

This security update resolves a security feature bypass in Microsoft Windows. An attacker could bypass Kerberos authentication on a target machine and decrypt drives protected by BitLocker. The bypass can be exploited only if the target system has BitLocker enabled without a PIN or USB key, the computer is domain-joined, and the attacker has physical access to the computer.

This security update is rated Important for all supported editions of Windows. For more information, see the Affected Software section.

The update addresses the bypass by adding an additional authentication check that will run prior to a password change. For more information about the vulnerability, see theVulnerability Information section.

For more information about this update, see Microsoft Knowledge Base Article 3105256.

How to add a driver to the DriverStore

All drivers are stored in the so called DriverStore, which is located under %SYSTEMDRIVE%\Windows\System32\DriverStore.

With the built-in command line tool pnputil you can add or remove drivers.

How does it work?

  1. Start an elevated command prompt (Start, type CMD, hit Ctrl+Shift+Enter)
  2. Adding a driver:
    • Pnputil.exe -a c:\LOCATION_OF_DRIVER\DRIVER_NAME.inf
      The location can be either local or remote
    • Pnputil.exe -a C:\LOCATION_OF_DRIVER\*.inf
      Copy all drivers from that folder
  3. Deleting a driver:
    • Pnputil.exe -d DRIVER_NAME.inf

Incompatibility between Windows 8 roaming user profiles and roaming profiles in other versions of Windows

Roaming user profiles on Windows 8-based or Windows Server 2012-based computers are incompatible with roaming user profiles in other versions of Windows.
Profiles are compatible only between the following client and server operating system pairs: 

  • Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 
  • Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 

Note In this article, when the client operating system is referenced, the same issue applies to its corollary server operating system.
For example, if you try to deploy Windows 8 in an environment that uses roaming, mandatory, super-mandatory, or domain default profiles in Windows 7, you experience the following:

  • After you use a user account that has an existing Windows 7 profile to log on to a Windows 8-based computer for the first time, the components from Windows 8 read and modify the profile state.
  • Certain Windows 8.1 features may not work as expected because the expected profile state is not present.
  • When you try to use the same user account to log on to a Windows 7-based computer, the user profile modification that was performed in Windows 8 may not work as expected in Windows 7.

The issues occur because the profile will contain values that are used differently between the versions of Windows. The user profile will be missing default profile configuration information that is expected by the operating system, and could contain unexpected values that are set by a different operating system version. Therefore, the operating system will not behave as expected. Additionally, profile corruption may occur.

 

Hotfix: Download

Change default Windows network Icon to something Cool!!

To change the network type please do the following:

Hit Winkey + R to open Run prompt and type gpedit.msc

Navigate to: Computer Configuration | Windows Settings | Security Setting | Network List Manager Policies

Choose your Network name from the right pane. In my case network name was wardvissers.local

image

image

So the policy look likes

image

Now we have a Smiley for my wardvissers.local domain Smile with tongue out Cool!!

image

Microsoft release a cool tool named Disk cleanup on Windows 7 Sp1

Microsoft released an update yesterday for the Disk cleanup utility. The problem Windows keeps copies of installed updates from Windows Update, even after installing newer version of updates. So the older versions of updates that are no longer needed and taking up space.

In Windows XP era the uninstalls were just hidden folders under Windows directory so easy to clean. Since Windows Vista this is now stored in the Windows Services folder WinSXS.

The space used by WinSXS can grow significant. In the past you could remove Service Pack uninstall files which helped, but Service Packs are not so common anymore. I think Windows 7 will never see SP2, yet the updates keep filling the WinSXS folder every month.

After the update is installed (no reboot needed) and you run Diskcleanup:

cleanup1

and when you click “Clean up system files”

You’ll see new options:

cleanup2

This update of diskcleanup delivers a new option Windows Update cleanup which deletes older versions of updates that are no longer needed and just taking up space.

The update is available through Windows Update as important or direct download at KB article posted below:

KB2852386: Update is available that enables you to delete outdated Windows updates by using a new option in the Disk Cleanup wizard in Windows 7 SP1

Now unfortunately this update is not available for Windows Server 2008 R2, while there are plenty scenarios where cleaning up WinSXS folder is helpful there too!

Bink.nu

Windows 7 and Windows 8 Optimization Guide for Horizon View Virtual Desktops & Antivirus Best Practices for Horizon View 5.x

VMware released two great documents!!

Windows 7 and Windows 8 Optimization Guide for Horizon View Virtual Desktops

Antivirus Best Practices for Horizon View 5.x

List of Performance hotfixes for Windows 7 SP1

Applies to:
Windows 2008 R2 SP1
Windows 7 Service Pack 1
Windows 7 SP1

Article ID: 2505438 – Slow performances in applications that use the DirectWrite API on a computer that is running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2505438

Article ID: 2505454 – The startup process is delayed on a computer that has a large hard disk installed and is running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2505454

Article ID: 2510636 – An update that improves the startup performance of Windows 7 and of Windows Server 2008 R2 is available
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2510636

Article ID: 2523887 – You may encounter file corruption issues when you use the Offline Files feature to synchronize data in Windows 7
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2523887

Article ID: 2524478 – The network location profile changes from "Domain" to "Public" in Windows 7 or in Windows Server 2008 R2. This problem can affect Group Policy processing at boot time because NLA does not know what network profile to use.
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2524478

Article ID: 2525332 – You encounter a long logon time after you enable the "Do not automatically make redirected folders available offline" Group Policy setting in Windows 7 or in Windows Server 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2525332

Article ID: 2555428 – The Windows 7 startup process is slow when you create many restore points
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2555428

Article ID: 2561285 – You experience a long domain logon time in Windows 7 or in Windows Server 2008 R2 after you deploy Group Policy preferences to the computer
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2561285

Article ID: 2561708 – Offline files synchronization may not finish on a computer that is running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2561708

Article ID: 2581608 – Logon scripts take a long time to run in Windows Vista, in Windows Server 2008, in Windows 7 or in Windows Server 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2581608

Article ID: 2582112 – Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2 stops responding when an application performs many I/O operations to a network share
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2582112

Article ID: 2610379 – The Folder Redirection policy does not work if a previous user sets a redirected folder to an offline mode in Windows 7 or in Windows Server 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2610379

Article ID: 2617858 – Unexpectedly slow startup or logon process in Windows Server 2008 R2 or in Windows 7
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2617858

Article ID: 2625434 – "ERROR_SHARING_VIOLATION" error message in Windows XP or in Windows Server 2003 when you try to open a file on an SMB share on a server that is running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2625434

Article ID: 2640148 – Windows Explorer stops responding if you try to expand a mapped drive in Windows 7 or in Windows Server 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2640148

Article ID: 2645611 – Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2 stops responding if you try to log on a computer that has multiple monitors
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2645611

Delay occurs when you log on to a domain from a computer that is running Windows 7 or Windows Server 2008 R2
http://support.microsoft.com/?id=2709630

Article ID: 2709630  2690528 Slow performance when you browse the My Documents folder in the document library in Windows 7 or in Windows Server 2008 R2

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2690528/en-us

An update is available for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 KMS hosts to support Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012

This update extends the Key Management Service (KMS) for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 to allow enterprise licensing of Windows 8 and of Windows Server 2012.
KMS provides support for the following KMS client activations:

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 (SP1)
  • Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 Service Pack 2 (SP2)
  • Windows 8
  • Windows Server 2012
  • Windows 7 and Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1)
  • Windows Vista and Windows Vista Service Pack 2 (SP2)

Key Management Service (KMS) uses a KMS host key to activate KMS on a KMS host, and to establish a local activation service in your environment. This update extends support for KMS to provide activation for Windows 8 and for Windows Server 2012.

Download

OS not starting after removing extra bitlocker boot partition

If you remove the 300mb hidden partition your system does not start anymore.

Solution 1:

Open command prompt
bcdboot c:\windows /s c:
Open diskmgmt.msc & Mark Partion as Active.
Reboot the VM.
Delete the BDEdrive partitie.
Extend the C-Disk with the empty space

Solution 2:

Boot with Windows 7 or WIndows 2008 R2 installation DVD, select repair and open a command prompt.
Type diskpart
Type select disk 0
Type list partition
then note the partition number where you installed windows 7.
Type select partition X (X is the partition number where Windows is installed)
type active
type exit
type bcdboot.exe c:\windows (if C is your windows partition)